Categories / Film and TV

Retro TV W/C 30th April 2010

Jagger

Barry Murphy returns once more to trawl the TV and radio guides (so you don't have to), finding anything worth tuning into this week. All listings are for UK terrestrial TV, Freeview and national radio, with the shows running from Friday 30th April to Thursday 6th May 2010.

Highlights of the week

What is the DNA of a great rock 'n' roll band? New series I'm in a Rock 'n' Roll Band! (BBC 2. Saturday 1st, 9.40pm. Repeated Thursday 6th, 11.40pm) breaks this mythical beast down into its constituent parts: singer, guitarist, drummer as well as the shadowy 'other one', whose face we don't quite know but without whom the magic wouldn't happen. The evidence is examined closely in forensic studies of what makes these rock 'n' roll types tick, starting with the lead singer. Often he's the leader, sometimes the dictator, benign or otherwise. His voice is his instrument and out front there's nowhere to hide. He hires. He fires. And when it all goes wrong and the backlash begins, he will get the blame.


This promises to be an eye-opening romp through great war stories from the rock 'n' roll frontline exploring the myriad ways of tackling the daunting role of front person. From the seemingly fearless, like taboo-shattering Jim Morrison of The Doors, to the mesmerically fragile, like Joy Division's ill-starred Ian Curtis. From Mick Jagger, who drew up the blueprint of front man as athlete, lothario and chairman of the board to the swaggeringly cantankerous yet strangely static force of nature that is Liam Gallagher.

A starry cast list, including Iggy Pop, Roger Daltrey and Dave Grohl, considers how and why they do what they do on and off stage. Sting speculates where necessary confidence ends and arrogance begins, while Muse's Matt Bellamy wonders whether a tendency towards the diva-ish is an inevitable by-product of the pressures of being the band's focal point. Shaun Ryder of Happy Mondays recalls harsh lessons learnt from underestimating the tabloids, and Siouxsie Sioux revels in the moments when it all goes right.

Also this week BBC 1 launches a new series exploring the Modern Masters (BBC 1. Sunday 2nd, 9pm), asking if the work of four notable and influential artists of our time merit them being called modern masters. The first subject is Andy Warhol, who began work as a commercial artist in New York in 1949. Presenter Alastair Sooke explores Walhol's transition to fine art and assesses his pivotal contribution to the pop art movement.

Friday 30th April

TV

The Professionals – ITV 4. 6.00pm – 7.00pm
Bodie and Doyle quiz their former mentor.

Ashes to Ashes (5/8) – BBC 1. 9.00pm – 10.00pm
Series three. New. DCI Gene Hunt's former Manchester colleagues, DCI Litton and DI Bevan, turn up on his patch. They're in pursuit of Northern comic Frank Hardwick (Roy Hudd) who's wanted for stealing cash from the Police Widows Fund. However their desperation to track him down creates suspicion.

Hugh Masekela: Welcome to South Africa – BBC 4. 9.00pm – 10.00pm

New. The musician reflects on his career, from first picking up a trumpet in the 1950s through the apartheid years, to his stardom in America and the return to South Africa on the release of Nelson Mandela. The programme also features performances from his 70th birthday celebrations from his 70th birthday celebrations at the Barbican Centre in London.

The African Rock 'n' Roll Years – (2/6) – BBC 4. 10.00pm – 11.00pm
An exploration of South Africa's musical legacy, revealing the importance of protest songs during the struggle against apartheid. The programme considers the careers of Miriam Makeba and Hugh Masekela, who became the first African singers to find fame in the West.

Make 'Em Laugh (1/6) – BBC 4. 11.00pm – 12Midnight

Series chronicling over 100 years of American comedy, beginning with a look at the popularity of characters seen as a source of mirth, as portrayed by the likes of Harold Lloyd, Bob Hope, Woody Allen and Andy Kaufman.

Make 'em Laugh (2/6) – BBC 4. 12Midnight – 1.00am
Amy Sedaris examines how American comedies such as I Love Lucy, Seinfield and The Simpsons reflect the complex political manoeuvrings of the home and the workplace.

Saturday 1st May

TV

Minder – ITV 4. 8.00pm – 9.00pm
Arthur persuades Terry to mind Alex's shop.

The Prisoner (3/6) – ITV 1. 9.00pm – 10.00pm
New series. Anvil. Two enlists Six to spy on the Dreamers – those villagers who experience nocturnal revelations about the outside world. Six is both elated and terrified when he discovers that his friend, the Village doctor 313, is one of them.

Auf Wiedersehen, Pet – ITV 4. 9.00pm – 11.10pm
Double bill of the classic comedy. New plumber Harry joins the gang.

I'm in a Rock 'n' Roll Band! (1/6) – BBC 2. 9.40pm – 10.40pm

New series. The Singer. A celebration of the defining music genre of the postwar era by examining the constituent parts of the ultimate rock band – this week it's the lead singer – culminating in a live show next month, where industry experts discuss their favourite musicians and create the ultimate fantasy band.

Make 'em Laugh (3/6) – BBC 4. 11.25pm – 12.20am
Amy Sedaris examines the attraction of slapstick comedy, discovering how the genre has evolved into a genuine art form, and explores the enduring appeal of Laurel and Hardy and the Marx Brothers.

Film: The Filth and the Fury (2000) – Film4. 12.45pm – 2.55am

Julien Temple's revealing documentary about the career of punk icons the Sex Pistols.

Radio

Sounds of the 60s – BBC Radio 2. 8.00am – 10.00am
Brian Matthew spins two hours of hits, B -sides and album tracks.

The Funk and Soul Show – BBC 6 Music. 7.00pm – 10.00pm

3 hours of funk, soul and blues presented by Craig Charles.

Sunday 2nd May

TV

Film: Charade (1963) – ITV 3. 9.50am – 12.05pm
Classy romantic comedy thriller starring Cary Grant, Audrey Hepburn and Walter Matthau.

Film: Dad's Army (1971) – BBC 2. 5.30pm – 7.00pm
The film version of the popular TV sitcom starring Arthur Lowe and John Le Mesurier. In 1940, with a German invasion threatened, the defence of Walmington-on-Sea is in the hands of Captain Mainwaring and a motley collection of townsfolk.

Don't Panic! The Dad's Army Story – BBC 2. 7.00pm – 7.50pm

Victoria Wood pays tribute to the timeless humour of Dad's Army, which sprang from the fertile pens of Jimmy Perry and David Croft, and introduces classic moments from the long-running series first broadcast in 1968.

The Professionals – ITV 4. 7.00pm – 8.00pm
The team tracks a Soviet spy.

The Sweeney – ITV 4. 8.00pm – 9.00pm
A missing small-time crook turns up dead.

Modern Masters (1/4) – BBC 1. 9.00pm – 10.00pm
New series. Does the work of four notable and influential artists of our time merit them being called modern masters? The first subject is Andy Warhol, who began work as a commercial artist in New York in 1949. Presenter Alastair Sooke explores Walhol's transition to fine art and assesses his pivotal contribution to the pop art movement.

The South Bank Show Revisited – ITV 1. 10.45pm – 11.45pm

David Hockney. The artist returns to his native Yorkshire as he embarks on an ambitious project which will see him take over the Royal Academy in 2012.

Film: The Birds (1963) – ITV 1. 11.45pm – 1.50am
Classic Hitchcock chiller starring Tippi Hedren and Rod Taylor. A chance meeting in San Francisco impels a wealthy playgirl to track down lawyer Mitch Brenner at his mother's home.

Film: Harper (1966) – BBC 2. 12Midnight – 1.55am
Thriller starring Paul Newman and Lauren Bacall. When Mrs Sampson hires Lew Harper to track down her missing husband, Harper finds himself involved with theft, Kidnap and murder.

Hugh Masekela: Welcome to South Africa – BBC 4. 12.30am – 1.30am
The musician reflects on his career, from first picking up a trumpet in the 1950s through the apartheid years, to his stardom in America and the return to South Africa on the release of Nelson Mandela. The programme also features performances from his 70th birthday celebrations from his 70th birthday celebrations at the Barbican Centre in London.

Film: Let's Get Lost (1988) – BBC 2. 1.55am – 3.55am
In this documentary, fashion photographer Bruce Weber combines interviews, recording sessio
ns, archive footage and home movies to present a portrait of the troubled but gifted jazz trumpeter Chet Baker. Filmed a year before Baker's death, the soundtrack features the likes of Duke Ellington, Dizzy Gillespie and, of course, Baker himself.

Monday 3rd May

TV

The Sweeney – ITV 4. 7.00pm – 8.00pm
Regan cracks down on gun smuggling.

The Prisoner (3/6) – ITV 4. 9.00pm – 10.00pm
New series. Anvil. Two enlists Six to spy on the Dreamers – those villagers who experience nocturnal revelations about the outside world. Six is both elated and terrified when he discovers that his friend, the Village doctor 313, is one of them.

Rising Damp – ITV 3. 10.30pm – 11.00pm
Rigsby discovers he has a rival for Miss Jones's affection.

Make 'Em Laugh (4/6) – BBC 4. 11.50pm – 12.45am
Amy Sedaris examines how performers including Richard Pryor pushed the boundaries of taste in their routines.

Tuesday 4th May

TV

Minder – ITV 4. 8.00pm – 9.00pm
Maurice organises a gambling club, roping in Terry and Arthur to look after affairs until he makes a profit.

Later Liveā€¦ with Jools Holland – BBC 2. 10.00pm – 10.30pm

Joanna Newsom performs in the studio, plus Iggy Pop chats about the reissue of his classic album Raw Power.

Flight of the Conchords (3/10) – BBC 4. 10.30pm – 11.00pm

Series two. Bret forms a gang after insulting a group of rappers.

Film: The Warriors (1979) – ITV 4. 11.10pm – 1.10am

Walter Hill's classic comic-book urban western, centring on a New York gang whose members battle their way back to home turf following the murder of a rival gang leader during a ceasefire meeting.

Wednesday 5th May

TV

Flight of the Conchords (4/12) – BBC 4. 11.00pm – 11.30pm
Series two. Bret and Jermaine accidentally insult Murray's best friend.

Film: The Warriors (1979) – ITV 4. 9.00pm – 11.00pm

Walter Hill's classic comic-book urban western, centring on a New York gang whose members battle their way back to home turf following the murder of a rival gang leader during a ceasefire meeting.

Film: Scum (1979) – ITV 4. 11.00pm – 12.55am
Vicious prison drama starring Ray Winstone. Transferred between borstals after assaulting an officer, a violent and troubled youth must fight his way to the top of the hierarchy of inmates if he is to survive.

Make 'Em Laugh (5/6) – BBC 4. 11.30pm – 12.25am

Amy Sedaris examines the history of the wiseguy.

Thursday 6th May

TV

Rising Damp – ITV 3. 9.30pm – 10.00pm
Gloomy new tenant Mr Gray moves in to Rigsby's boarding house.

Film: Kes (1969) – ITV 3. 11.10pm – 1.20am
Poignant drama starring David Bradley. Billy Casper's life gains a sense of purpose when he finds a kestrel's nest from which he takes a fledgeling to raise as a pet.

Make 'Em Laugh (6/6) – BBC 4. 11.25pm – 12.20am
Amy Sedaris analyses America's tradition of parody by examining the work of satirists.

I'm in a Rock 'n' Roll Band! (1/6) – BBC 2. 11.40pm – 12.40am

The Singer. A celebration of the defining music genre of the postwar era by examining the constituent parts of the ultimate rock band – this week it's the lead singer – culminating in a live show next month, where industry experts discuss their favourite musicians and create the ultimate fantasy band.

Radio

Launching the Style Decade – BBC Radio 4. 11.30pm – 12Mid-day
In the summer of 1980 The Face was launched by the former NME editor Nick Logan. It was a music magazine that advocated that music didn't matter unless everyone looked good. With the innovative marriage of fashion and pop, "the best dressed magazine" quickly became the arbiter of style and cool in 1980s England. Robert Elms looks back at its origins and legacy.